NASCAR’14 Review

Building on a solid foundation without dramatic alterations, NASCAR ’14 focuses on delivering an improved experience to its core audience. For the most part, it succeeds–and will be fascinating to see when and where it goes on next-generation consoles

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Devil May Cry HD Review

A legendary series with classic problems. The Devil May Cry series set a bold precedent for action games in the early 2000s. Each of the first three games created challenging, stylish, and intense experiences, forcing players to learn combat, special moves, and evasion to survive. Now, Capcom and Pipeworks have brought the three original games together and packaged them into an HD collection. After battling through roughly half of each game in the set, certain elements gained clarity. The collection delivers all the great content of the originals, but it feels aged by the frustrating camera and lack of consistency in their HD upgrades. The Devil May Cry HD Collection includes Devil May Cry, Devil May Cry 2, and Devil May Cry 3: Dante’s Awakening for the reasonable price of $40. The content remains true to the originals, making the graphical updates a key addition. Also, this is the first time these titles are available to Xbox gamers. The games follow Dante, the demon slaying son of an infamous demon named Sparda.Through the three games, Dante meets a cast of eclectic characters and winds deeper and deeper into the split world between hell and earth. Thousands of demons want to kill him and will do whatever it takes to make this happen (he gets horribly mauled during countless cut-scenes — but heals up just fine). The story isn’t what makes this series good. There are so many odd dialogue choices and character twists that it’s difficult to keep up. But the extent to which all three Devil May Cry games dance into the ridiculous is also what makes them special. The dialogue, violence, and events border the ridiculous; riding a missile around, firing bullets into pool balls to accelerate them, and getting stabbed through the chest with an electric sword all make the experience special. The Devil May Cry series presents its own universe of weird, and it’s exciting for all involved. Read full review at IGN VN:F [1.9.22_1171]GameplayGrphicsSoundValueplease wait...Rating: 8.7/10 (1 vote cast)Submit VN:F [1.9.22_1171]Ratingplease wait...Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)VN:F [1.9.22_1171]Rating: +2 (from 2...

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Ninja Gaiden 3 – Review
Apr01

Ninja Gaiden 3 – Review

All flash and no substance: Ninja Gaiden 3 is a shallow action game with little of the series’ challenge and depth. The Good Flashy, brutal swordplay is always a pleasure to watch Online play instills a sense of progression A few memorable encounters. The Bad Shallow action lacks the depth and challenge of previous Ninja Gaiden games Intrusive story elements bog down the pace Recycled boss fights require too little skill Terrible PlayStation Move support Previous Ninja Gaiden games assumed you were a master swordsman. They gave you the tools to succeed and expected you to use them, having you bounding from walls before plunging a sharp blade into your enemies’ bowels in a series of dizzying attacks. The challenge was steep but surmountable, and the thrilling acrobatics you witnessed onscreen were a direct result of your skill and finesse. Ninja Gaiden 3, on the other hand, has little faith in you. On medium difficulty, you don’t need to do much but hammer on a few buttons and occasionally block or dodge, yet every last kill is a cinematic event. Where previous games rewarded you for how adeptly you manipulated the controller, this one rewards you for pressing X. Forgot how to climb a wall? Ninja Gaiden 3 reminds you every time. (Do yourself a favor and turn off tutorial prompts after the first few levels.) Was your mind boggled by having multiple weapons and ninpo attacks before? Never fear: Ninja Gaiden 3 gives hero Ryu Hayabusa only a single weapon and a single ninpo. If you came to this series for deep, challenging combat, be prepared: this is no longer your Ninja Gaiden. If you’re more interested in visual spectacle than combat depth, however, you’ll find plenty of it here. You don’t lop off any heads or arms, but you certainly get your fill of dramatic brutality. With each assassination comes a cinematic animation in which the camera swoops in close as Ryu eviscerates and emasculates. Quick-time events intrude at every turn, giving you heaps of time to react and dramatizing spittle-flecked boss confrontations and graceful dives onto enemy aircraft. Every so often, you can hold a single button, and Ryu races from one fiend to the next, slicing and dicing without your having to lift an additional finger. If you prize form over function, Ninja Gaiden 3 might be enough to tide you over until the next mindless action game comes along. Read full review at GameSpot VN:F [1.9.22_1171]GameplayGrphicsSoundValueplease wait...Rating: 7.7/10 (1 vote cast)Submit VN:F [1.9.22_1171]Ratingplease wait...Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)VN:F [1.9.22_1171]Rating: 0 (from 0...

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Rayman Origins
Apr01

Rayman Origins

Rayman Origins a 2D platformer Straddling a thin line between demanding and forgiving, Rayman Origins is a rare 2D platformer that owes a debt of gratitude to the past without being burdened by it. There’s an unyielding level of difficulty bubbling beneath the surface of this terrific side-scroller, but it’s complemented by a decidedly modern abundance of checkpoints and infinite lives so that your fate rests squarely in your own hands. Combined with a relentlessly charming art design that’s equal parts absurd and beautiful, Rayman Origins is a platformer that gives you every last reason to keep running along in spite of any challenges you encounter. Rayman Origins is a living, breathing testament to the artistic capabilities of a 2D canvas. Every one of the game’s numerous landscapes is filled with rich, hand-drawn detail, from the lush foliage of Jibberish Jungle to the flurrying snowfalls of Mystical Pique. There’s an almost eccentric level of variety on display here. One moment, you swim through a haunting underwater abyss; the next, you leap across an industrial cooking pot full of molten lava in some hellacious version of a Mexican restaurant kitchen. Whether it’s your own character or the many different enemies you encounter, the 2D animations are wonderfully fluid and impress a strong kinetic energy onto every last bit of movement. And move you do; this platformer is built with the idea of player momentum firmly in mind. Most levels are intricately designed pathways built to encourage a quick pace, with rapidly transforming (often crumbling) environments, wide gaps, and enemies that frequently get the best of you if not attacked head-on. Fortunately, the tight, responsive controls in Rayman Origins give you every tool you need to accomplish this left-to-right journey. You start only being able to sprint and jump, but you eventually unlock new abilities, such as gliding through the air and running up walls or ceilings. And no matter how extravagant your move set becomes, the game always responds precisely to your inputs. Read full review at GameSpot VN:F [1.9.22_1171]Ratingplease wait...Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)VN:F [1.9.22_1171]Rating: 0 (from 0...

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FIFA Street Review
Mar18

FIFA Street Review

Most people make do with one football game a year. They dutifully buy their copy of FIFA or PES every autumn, and it merrily tides them over for the next 12 months. But EA firmly believes that the marketplace can support more than one football game. Why not? Consumers regularly buy more than one first-person shooter and more than one role-playing game. Enter the rebooted FIFA Street franchise. Where previous entries in the series had a heightened sense of reality, with caricatured player likenesses and a camera partial to the odd crash-zoom, the new FIFA Street is much more in keeping with the core FIFA franchise. This doesn’t mean it’s been sapped of what makes street football potentially so electric and exhilarating; it simply creates a sense of continuity between the two titles. And that’s no bad thing when the other game is FIFA 12, one of the best-selling sports games ever made. But FIFA Street isn’t a cynical, half-hearted entry into the series, it’s got an interesting career mode, a simple yet effective control scheme, and is just really, really good fun when played with friends. Presentation is good, but never approaches breathtaking. A lot of the environments are interesting and vibrant, but lack the level of detail to really sell them. Although none of the stages rouse you like a packed Wembley stadium, there’s a great deal of variety. You can play in parks, gyms, and backstreets, on a rooftop in Shanghai, or in front of the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. And this isn’t just superficial gloss – each environment is subtly different. The dimension of pitches vary, as do the size of the goals. These variables subtly influence the way in which a game unfolds. Play on a smaller pitch and things are a bit more crowded – you’ll pass less and rely more on close control. Conversely, a match on a larger playing surface will encourage passing and more enterprising playing styles. It introduces a refreshing and welcomed degree of variety to matches. The camera is locked-off and there’s no commentary. Instead, you’ll be able to hear the shouts of your players as they hustle play and demand the ball. Occasionally, it’s a little strange to hear players from around the world communicating with inappropriate accents, but it’s a minor niggle that will only trouble the pedantic. Games lack the palpable atmosphere that you find in FIFA 12. Read full review at: IGN review site VN:F [1.9.22_1171]Ratingplease wait...Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)VN:F [1.9.22_1171]Rating: 0 (from 0...

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